Monday, September 01, 2008

Guyland

Book suggests that the transition from adolescence to adulthood in males continues to get longer but may not be a good thing... Food for thought: http://www.newsweek.com/id/156372



3 comments:

Bloody Ice Cream said...

I liked this article, I really did. I think it's important to recognize that strict gender roles have a negative influence on the Y chromosome set too. However, there are two parts of this article that piss me off:

1. "Since 1971, annual salaries for males 25 to 34 with full-time jobs have plummeted almost 20 percent, according to the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University. At the same time, women have crashed just about all the old male haunts, and are showing some signs of outpacing their husbands and boyfriends as breadwinners and heads of family, at least in urban centers... As a result, many men feel redundant."

The article seems to be saying that the average man's decrease in salary is a result of women entering the workforce (as opposed to, say, fucked up foreign and domestic policies designed to favor corporations). Women have to enter the workforce because the economy is in the stinker; the economy is not in the stinker because women have entered the workforce.


2. "Another guy, 26, an Arizona State alum who lives in Tempe, is a coupon-book salesman, but clearly self-conscious: he carries fake business cards touting him as an MTV entertainment executive."

Ah, the thin line between tricking young women into bed and flat out date raping them...

B-Ho said...

Oh yes, there are definitely problems in this article... plus the horrifying-if-true statistic that one in 5 men would commit rape if they knew they wouldn't get caught!

I just think it's interesting to think about this new "extended adolescence" period and what effects it may have on our society, on members of either gender, that's all...

Bloody Ice Cream said...

At least we're a step ahead of Marie Howe:

"I've been thinking about the sorrow of men, and how it's different from the sorrow of women, although I don't know how -"

- "In the Movies"